16/01/2020 16/01/2020 Generally speaking, by “apocalypse” (ἀποκάλυψις) the people understand “revelation” or, more literally, “uncovering”. The term is tied, mainly, with Saint John Theologian’s work – Book of Revelation – from the New Testament which describes using pseudonymity and symbolic imagery for the expectation of an imminent cosmic cataclysm in which God destroys the ruling powers of...
16 Ιανουαρίου, 2020 - 13:30
Τελευταία ενημέρωση: 16/01/2020 - 13:43

My apocalypse

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My apocalypse

Generally speaking, by “apocalypse” (ἀποκάλυψις) the people understand “revelation” or, more literally, “uncovering”. The term is tied, mainly, with Saint John Theologian’s work – Book of Revelation – from the New Testament which describes using pseudonymity and symbolic imagery for the expectation of an imminent cosmic cataclysm in which God destroys the ruling powers of evil and raises the righteous to life in a messianic kingdom.

However, there are many apocalypses till today and not all of them are of catastrophic nature. On the contrary.

If I draw closer to God by cleansing my soul then I will have enough apocalypses because God wants to help me much more than anyone else in the world and, besides that, he has the power to do it.

My apocalypse which God sent to me has the property to help in doing good and/or prevent me in doing bad even if, perhaps, for the others my apocalypse doesn’t have a lot of importance. God is personal and has the power to work on an absolute personal plane.

For example, it was the eve of the feast of the Holy Trinity, which the monastery on Aegina celebrated. Saint Nektarios was ill in bed and was unable to preside at the vigil. The nuns asked him if they should ring the bells. He replied: ‘Ring the bells. The priest’s are coming’. As they rang the bells, Saint Ieronymos of Simonopetra entered the monastery. ‘Didn’t I tell you the priest was coming? And he’s the Abbot of a monastery on Athos, Saint Nektarios said to them. After the vigil was over, Saint Nektarios asked Saint Ieronymos to visit all the cells of the nuns, in order to bless them. But he didn’t want to obey God’s bishop and slipped quietly away. When he told the story later, he wept, saying: ‘Who was I compared to a saint…’.

He always remembered the saint’s request, however, and, three days before he departed this life, in 1957, he went and blessed the nuns’ cells.

In the photo Abbot Ephraim in a moment from the reception of the holy relics of Saint Hieronymos of Simonopetra. Vatopedi Monastery, Mount Athos.

 

— Source: asceticexperience.com

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